short

The Edited Read: Post-it Poetry

Just came across an interesting interview on the blog “Little Word Studio” – where Melissa Kandel interviewed a writer based in Hollywood (self-styled as sob), who writes post-it poems and places them around his favourite walking route.  Here’s my quick highlights of what was said – see the full-length interview here.

Why write poetry on Post-its?

  • I went to grad school for directing but fell into writing out of compulsion. I was an English major in undergrad so I have those roots and it takes a ton of money and time to make a movie, where all it takes is a pen and paper to write. I’m currently trying to sell some scripts and get attachments for a movie I’m directing while working on the second draft of the aforementioned novel while also doing a ton of freelance film-related work. Basically, the old Hollywood Hustle.

What is the writing process?

  • Everything is an inspiration. I get hit constantly with little thoughts that I jot down into Notes on my phone, then I’ll try to sit down for a few hours once or twice a week to write them all into a longer word document and re-shape them. In addition, I’ll force myself to write a dozen or so new ones while I’m there and have the time.

Writers you admire?

  • As far as the authors, my lifelong obsessions are James Joyce and Shakespeare. But beyond that we have the other modernists, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, W.B. Yeats, etc. I love the Romantics: Blake, Shelley, Wordsworth, etc. Let’s see off the top of my head without cheating and looking at the bookshelves 12 inches from me—Carroll. Pynchon. Mark Z. Danielewski!, Fitzgerald, Austen, Auden, Donna Tartt, (OK, cheating now) … Eh— you get the idea. Everyone. I wish I read more philosophy.

 

Creative Takeaway

This week’s challenge: follow sob’s writing process, making short notes of words/phrases during the week, then sit down for an hour or two and stick with it until you get about 20 phrases.  Then write them on post-its and/or instagram.

Or if you like the physical texture of paper and pen – write them on postcards and post to friends.

 

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Time travel and Pizza

Time travel and pizza….. Well, what more could you ask for in a short animation?  Looking at the website https://slipperyedge.com,  I came across this oscar-nominated short video.  Just two minutes of your earth time.  Or is it more?  Or less?

Creative Takeaways

Slippery Edge like to feature the work of creative folk – have a look at their website and see if your work might fit their style.  If so, you can submit it to them.  They draw from artworks around the world and may be another shop window to display your work.  And certainly, a good place to view a lot of good work from a wide range of international sources.

Categories they’re looking for work in are:

  • advertising
  • architecture
  • art
  • cinematography
  • music
  • photography
stained glass, Arran

Stained Glass and Making films – Richard Leclerc and Make Works

Having had so many posts last week about collage – here are 2 similar in a much more expensive media – stained glass and video.

  1.  Stained Glass

    A brief, one and a half minute film about Richard Leclerc, who lives and works on Arran Island, with a stained glass making practice.

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“Weather the Storm” Short Musical Animation

“Weather the Storm” by Trunk & Radish Pictures is just exquisite animation short set to  a song, examining a difficult time – in this case, bereavement, in under 5 minutes.  Unsurprisingly, it won an award in the 2016 British Animation Awards.

I heard the most wonderful quote recently from a TV presenter, Sandi Toksvig, almost a throwaway line as she chatted with a contestant on the Great British Bake Off: “Marriage is everything and nothing” meaning it’s made up of the seemingly insignificant daily stuff and yet it’s an important relationship which colours our life.  This video contemplates loss through a tiny part of daily life (toothpaste and toothbrushes) – gently observed and ultimately positive.

Screen-Shot-2016-04-05-at-09.11.54

Director Peter Baynton received 2016 British Award Animation for Public Choice Best Music Video

The song on the soundtrack is “Weather the Storm” by Benjamin Scheuer, from the album “The Lion”.  More about his work on his website here.

Director: Peter Baynton for Radish Pictures.

Producer: Daniel Negret

Exec producer: Richard Barnett

both at Trunk.

I love the gentle watercolour like textures and way it conveys the central figure as struggling to go forward despite a strong headwind against him, while other characters nonchalently and speedily bounce by, often in the opposite direction, through simple landscapes.  In this one still, shown below, you can see the contrast: the main character holding onto a bench arm for grim life, just to stay still in the storm of emotions, while another person sits nonchalently on the bench, reading a newspaper, chomping on a sandwich and drinking a cuppa.

Screen shot 2017-09-20 at 12.15.04

still from the film “Weather the Storm”

2 minute Animation

Today, I saw the most amazing wee gem of an animation at the Edinburgh Film Festival, among a showcase of short animated films, for the Maclaren Prize.

It is animated typography.  It was joyous and positive and exciting, and completely stood out, for me.

The Director/maker adds this info:

Amy Johnson worked as a typist for a firm of solicitors before her record- breaking solo flight from Croydon to Australia in 1930. This film has been created with an Underwood 315 typewriter as a celebration of her journey.

Lizzy Hobbs is a name to watch, for future animation.

Note: the Maclaren prize is after Norman Maclaren, the great Scottish animator who made so many great works in the National Film Board of Canada.  You can see his joyful animation “Begone Dull Care”, posted on this blog, last summer here.

 

 

Shortest poem?

I just came across this intriguing video answer to that question.

First of all, I need to say that the presenter is slightly too inTENse in the WAy he spEaks. But don’t let this put you off, the content is interesting, cooky and sometimes plan daft, with many examples.  Persist in viewing if you’re interested in words and wordplay. Or find yourself looking at a postcard and wondering how you can possibly write anything interesting in such a brief space.