Encouragement for a young actress

A blast of thoughts and ideas for a new actress starting out Continue reading Encouragement for a young actress

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“Don’t ever count yourself out”

Just watched a gripping documentary on BBC about Gene Cernan, astronaut.  If you’re in the UK, and pay a TV licence you can view it at:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0b3gd8g/the-last-man-on-the-moon

“Don’t ever count yourself out.  You’ll never know how good you are, unless you try.  Dream the impossible and then go out and make it happen.

I walked on the moon, what can’t you do?”

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Guest Post: 15 tips for a successful long distance relationship

Today’s guest post is used with permission from Monte Celia Parker – Caio, Monte! – who wrote this post for her personal blog, while studying Italian in Bologna, 4,000 miles from her boyfriend.  What she recommends for maintaining a good relationship longdistance is personal, but I thought there were enough great ideas to be worth repeating, to inspire others to personalise and adjust to the significant other in their life.  Also, I think a few of these ideas are superb for keeping in vital touch with close friends who don’t live nearby.  (That sounds a contradiction: close but far away!)

Here’s her post:

People have always told me that long distance relationships are hard–don’t do them. However, I found someone who I didn’t want to let go of even though I would be 4000 miles away, so lo and behold I would have to navigate the dreaded LDR (Long-Distance Relationship).

I’m going to say something right now that will shock you.

This long-distance relationship is incredibly EASY. That’s right, it’s not really a struggle for us.

Verona by Monte Celia Parker
Verona Photo: Monte Celia Parker

There are 2 reasons for this.

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poetry editing

50 ways to improve your poems

The first version of your poem is a first draft.  It’s exciting to have written it – but how do you make it the best it can be?  How can you improve your chances of getting it published and read by others?    I’ve pulled together some great advice from poetry professionals.

Simon Armitage – much-published UK leading poet (see previous blog posts on career tips here and videopoem here) has drawn together a testing kit for poetry at the Guardian newspaper: “How to write Poetry, Checklist”

Grace Wells – editor of American and Irish poetry magazines and Literary Festival organiser – has written a very down-to-earth list of 11 editing points at Advice on Editing Poetry

Magma Poetry is a well-known and well-regarded UK poetry magazine, inundated by manuscripts from hopeful poets – but they’ve got their head above tidal waves of submissions long enough to write: “25 rules for editing poems”

Robert Lee Brewer over at Writers Digest has scribed, revised and polished:

“5 ways to revise poetry”

 

Vital Beginning Advice

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Making art from a wheelchair

Chuck Close, in conversation,  describes his working process.  His interviewer is a particularly excellent interviewer and art commentator (and Artistic Director of the Royal Academy of Arts) – the knowledgeable and always watchable Tim Marlow. Chuck is known for his immense scale portraits, his work has sold internationally for decades.  Mid-career, he suffered a sudden catastrophic paralyzing physical event – but continues to work from his wheelchair, … Continue reading Making art from a wheelchair

Video Diary: NaNoWriMo

So National Novel Writing Month is nearly here.  What’s it like to work through the goal of writing 50,000 words of your novel in November? Kristina Horner shows us her 8th year’s experience of the programme – in only 7 minutes.

This video is a kaleidoscope of emotions in the life of a young person. I doubt if George Eliot had a similar writing process.  I am sure Virginia Woolf would have been horrified at the idea of 123,000 people viewing you in the process of writing.  But after all, this is a reflection on how the world of communication – written and verbal – is so entirely different now to classical ways of writing.

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