5 mins

photo, Jennifer Watt, Sculptor

Sculpture: Jennifer Watt

The best art needs little explanation: here are Jennifer Watt‘s sculptures – you only need to look at them for a moment for them to speak to you.

sculpture, dancers, Jennifer Watt, sculpture

Dancers sculpture by Jennifer Watt http://www.jenniferwatt.isendyouthis.com

 

 

 

“Dancers” A sculpture of two figures dancing.

Limited Edition
30cm x 50cm x 25cm
Edition of 6

£3,500

 

1861529

La Grande Fete, Sculpture 208

1873834

The Walk, Sculpture 122

Sculpture in three sets of two figures, that can be arranged in a circle or in a line as photograph.

Limited Edition
Cast Aluminium Resin
35cm x 40cm x 10cm
Edition of 25

£900

 

 

 

 

Figurative sculpture of an adult and child suitable for indoors or outdoors. In bronze resin on a green slate base.

Limited Edition
53cm x 30cm x 22cm
Edition of 25

£850

 

1862183

Protege, Sculpture 112

 

 

 

 

Sculpture on green slate base suitable for the garden.

Limited Edition
‘Cast Slate Resin’
76cm x 23cm
Edition of 25

£750

 

(Note: you can get an idea of the scale of these last 2 pieces from the featured photo of the sculptor with her works: you can see them on the right of the picture.)

Jennifer Watt was born in Dumfries, Scotland, and has returned to live near her birthplace.

You can find out more about her sculpture at her website or Instagram site

Memorial

I happen to have come across these sculptures on the anniversary of remembering a good friend’s wonderful mother.  The loss is still painful.  Perhaps an appropriate way to remember someone is with a beautiful piece of art or sculpture – I’ve also seen a stunning example of a woven tapestry of a lake landscape commissioned and made to commemorate a GP who was also a keen canoeist, which was gifted to the doctors’ practice by his family.

Creative Takeaways

You can use Jennifer’s sculptures as a prompt for writing creatively.  In her artist’s statement, she says “I search to create work which achieves an emotional response.” I certainly find her work inspires emotion and is easily readable.

If I were an organisation with a garden or entrance way, I would invest in her figures – they are surprisingly inexpensive, with many suitable for outdoor as well as indoor display.  (You can get an idea of the range of sizes of her figures in the featured photo of Jennifer with her works)

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Moonshine, Dreamworks, animator, painter

What art do animation artists love to make?

Just today, came across this lovely little video about the art which Dreamworks animation artists make in their private life – and an exhibition of it – great variations in styles and materials.  The cherry on the cake, for me, is an endearing comment at the very end from Jeffrey Katzenberg that he’d love to live among the art on the 3rd floor of  the Musee D’Orsay m, Paris (the Impressionists).  My feeling exactly, when I first encountered it, I practically had to be prised away with crowbars.  And I had to revisit the next day.  Hands up anyone else who had the same reaction?

After watching this, it is clear that animation artists are indeed fine artists – and they love to paint and draw.  All the time.  Even while waiting in a queue for something too mundane to mention.  Keenness and enthusiasm is right there.  One painter even dislikes selling her art to someone unless she knows the purchaser, she feels such a personal bond with her pictures.

Huge talent quietly shown here by: Sam Michalp, Nicholas Weis, Griselda Sastrawinata, Christian Schellewald, Paul Duncan, Marcos Mateu, Nathan Fowkes.

The book itself will be featured in my next blog post.

 

Simon Armitage, videopoem, video, poem, travel, poetry

Making poetry from the ordinary: Travel

Proof positive that when you’re writing a powerful poem, its shape can be something as simple as a twist on an everyday voice/situation, or the banal pauses between events. And yes, it can include humour.  And it can be great in a video.

(Video by Faber & Faber to illustrate poem “Thank you for Waiting)

Creative Takeaway Prompt

Do you have a very ordinary, boring situation/conversation/speech which you hear everyday?  Take that form and write it so that you make it talk about something else, something you feel passionately about.  Increase the strength of your words at the end to the extreme.  (As Simon Armitage does, in this video).

Advanced – time how long you think it will take you to read your poem, allowing an extra 5-10 seconds. Have a friend video you on a mobile phone in that banal situation, then do a voiceover of yourself reading the poem.  Finally, have the courage to put it on Youtube and publicise it in social media (this could be as simple as your personal Facebook page or Twitter.)

More video work – look at your written poems so far – is there one whose atmosphere could be videoed in a setting which reinforces the message?

Simon Armitage, poetry, writing, inspiration, tips

Getting Started Writing Poetry as a Career – Simon Armitage

Simon Armitage, a living writing poet, talks about his writing in 2010, and gives practical tips for writing poetry.

“I’ve always been interested in poetry because it’s so powerful: so few words, space on the page, and all around it.  So there’s an intensity there that I admire.”

(more…)

Alternative Christmas Tree - if you prefer to leave them uncut - get a Sandra Jordan photograph! Feature on the photographer's contemplative winter landscapes photos at www.commaand.co

Winter Photography: Alternative Christmas Tree

If you prefer your Christmas trees left in nature, unchopped, au naturelle – then an alternative for December decoration is to buy yourself a print from Sandra Jordan Photography.

The print featured is “Winter Forest #1”.  And, encouragingly, that number would lead you to assume that there are other photographs in a similar vein.  And you would be right.

With a touch of the poetic and humorous, this particular series is called Cabin Fever – and Sandra describes it thus:

cabin fever noun

a term for a claustrophobic reaction that takes place when a person is isolated and/or shut in a small space, with nothing to do for an extended period.

I live in a busy city, I live with a busy mind, sometimes I feel trapped within my own limited space and have an urge to run away, to escape. Photographing this series allows me to stop, breathe and take stock.  I hope that my  photographs allow the viewer to experience the same sense of space, serenity and peace.

(more…)

Ceramics craft and Fine art: Fiona Byrne-Sutton

What do you see in this featured photo of one set of Fiona’s ceramic works?  (My answers at bottom of this post). Here’s a brief taster of an article in Craft Scotland – full version here.

  1. she’d like her work to be on show at the new V&A in Dundee, Scotland (currently being built)
  2. she makes freestanding ceramic assemblages
  3. very influenced by medieval art in Florence, Italy
  4. studied fine art at Goldsmiths Art College (sounds like the start of a Pulp pop song!)
  5. as mature student, went on to study ceramics at Glasgow School of Art and Cardiff
  6. happily blends fine art and crafts in her work
  7. there are serious health and safety risks in her artmaking

The 8th fact is that I am instantly drawn to her work, its ins and outs, negative space, simple but cheerful colourways.

I wonder what you see in the shapes on the shelf?

What I notice in the constructions on the shelf are shapes and suggestions of:

elephant, teapot, nougat, pointing, half hoops and a bucket, negative space, a well, a house, a still, a pointing finger, a window, a door, niche, archway, cavity, emptying, filling and visual rhymes (where sometimes the shape is actual and the same shape is in an opening or negative space).

How Lyrics work – by Carly Simon

The now-defunct online magazine, Doubletake, printed a short but very good article on lyric writing, by Carly Simon, the hugely popular song writer.

Amazingly, at one point she was so discouraged about her apparent lack of success with songwriting, that she decided to give up on that career.  However, on her ferry trip home, a song from George Gershwin kept playing on the jukebox – and she found herself writing a poem in response, asking George how it was for him in his life and work.

As if he could hear me, I asked questions: “Did you buy your house in the country? Did you wait for something that never came? Did you die still waiting for your train?” Every time I asked a question, the refrain “Embrace me, my sweet, embraceable you, embrace me, you irreplaceable you” kept hitting, and as it kept hitting, I repeated it in my letter. It became a quoted chorus in a bed of my questions and observations. At the end of the letter, I vowed to go home and sit at the piano and try to write songs again. “In honor of you, George, in honor of you . . .”

This eventually became her song “In honor of you, George”.  The whole article on songwriting is still here to be read – and worth reading if you write lyrics.  (Thank you, Doubletake, for leaving it online.)

Creative Takeaways

  • If you’re feeling like giving up because no one ‘gets’ you or your art – just keep on going – pushing though discouragement has been an experience for pretty much every achiever (with the possible exception of child prodigies)
  • When you’re stuck and lyrics won’t come – write a response to someone who intrigues you, ask them questions.  This automatically gives you a starting point.

Going back to Carly, one of the recurring questions asked about her was who she wrote her big hit ‘You’re so vain” about?  Here’s the final answer….