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writing notebooks

Never too old to begin writing career

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Josephine Corcoran

Read this and share it with anyone who thinks they’ve left it too late to be a published writer.  It’s not!  Never!  Write what is in you to write.

Click on link below to read an entire article by Josephine Corcoran, bursting with stories of writers who began a serious career later, mostly in their 50s – and who are still writing and developing further as writers, today.  There’s a sense of beginning, not ending.

via My started late, stop-start writing “career”

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Simon Armitage, poetry, writing, inspiration, tips

Getting Started Writing Poetry as a Career – Simon Armitage

Simon Armitage, a living writing poet, talks about his writing in 2010, and gives practical tips for writing poetry.

“I’ve always been interested in poetry because it’s so powerful: so few words, space on the page, and all around it.  So there’s an intensity there that I admire.”

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Guest blog: Food Photography Tips

Have you ever cooked something rather wonderful – want to share the recipe with others – but found that when you took a photo, your glorious dish looked, well, underwhelming?

Professional photographer and food blogger “Cooking without Limits” has got it sorted out – I picked up some excellent tips from her blog – and she’s kindly agreed that I can share them.  Here’s how to deal with the nightmare of taking photos in poor light…..

Shooting in low-light is a challenge for all photographers. Late afternoons, rainy days, evenings or winter days are just a few situations when natural light is low. You could invest in artificial lights or flashes to deal with all this problems, but not all of us have money to spend on lighting studios. I have […]

via Tips for shooting low light food photography — Cooking Without Limits

The art of writing about art – a cure for writer’s block

This weekend past, I was shown a beautiful and enjoyable way to start new writing – with a beneficial side effect of getting rid of writer’s block: begin by responding to a picture. The technical term for this is Ekphrasis – see previous blog post a year ago, here.  And for me, it is hugely enjoyable, and a promising way forward.

This weekend’s workshop was called “Hidden Gems Open Masterclass: Ekphrasis: the art of writing about art”, held in City Art Centre, Edinburgh and tutored by Kate Hastie.  We met to receive some practical guidelines on Ekphrasis – and then simply took the lift down, to select an artwork in the new exhibition in the basement, “Hidden Gems”, and write poem or prose lines about it.

“Every painting is a library of information”  – Kate Hastie

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poetry

1 Nov, Day 1 of Poetry challenge

Can you write a poem, today on the topic “NEW DAY“.  This is day one of the PAD (Poem a Day) challenge for November.

If you’re taking part, interpret that how you will, and write a poem.

(If absolutely uninspired by this given topic – I know I’m finding it a bit obvious, cliched and bland – then do an experimental dip into Poetry Foundation online – lots of poets and poems to find out about – they also publish the American Poetry Magazine (front covers of it are featured image above this post).  Dip and dive through the website till you find something interesting or pick something totally at random and see if it can be melded to the topic of New Day – and that’s you at the startline.)

If you still come up with banalities and no inspiration – how about working them into a form of poetry which you haven’t tried before?  Then at least you’ll be learning and experimenting.

Robert Lee Brewster, setter of the Word Digest challenge – write a poem a day in November – has written his own example on that theme.

Robert Lee Brewster’s New Day Poem:

“& suddenly”

i had no desire for sugar
or processed foods or
anything else that might
taste good but tries to kill me

& i went for a run & lifted
weights & even sit ups
were not impossible & i
thought this is amazing

that i’m becoming this
version of myself that i
always thought i could be
until around midnight

when i gave in & had a snack
that turned into a meal that
transformed into a slide
that i hope someday will end

*****

 

7 reasons to write a poem a day in November

Just heard about this – minutes away from the 1st of November – a Poem-a-day challenge to write in response to a prompt – then make the best poems into a chapbook (poetry booklet) of 10-20 page before midnight 15th January.  Challenge by Writer’s Digest.

 

Why Take Part?

  1. Why not?  There is no entry fee, no requirement to even post that you intend to do this challenge.
  2. Because someone else is deciding on the prompts, you are very likely to find yourself writing about topics you don’t normally tackle.  Fresh ideas.
  3. The strength of the idea is in the increased practice in writing – it simply makes for sharper skills and more developed sense of smell for what works.
  4. it helps you find your own voice – you will be looking over a body of 30 poems – so easier to spot patterns and approaches.
  5. The person who sets the challenge has received notes from writers who took part, saying that they eventually printed some of the poems written in that November challenge – or that it formed the basis of a collection.
  6. It’s probably still easier than NaNoWriMo
  7. The thrill of the challenge.  Stepping into the unknown.

 

Full details of the challenge here.