exhibition

CURATORS INVITING VIDEO – Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

I’ve watched with interest the dawn of curators describing their exhibitions to possible attenders.  The small Dulwich Picture Gallery in London started really well with its director, Ian Dejardin.  In a few minutes, he would tell us what to see, in a quietly enthusiastic way.

Now this – the gallery has TWO curators having a discussion and walking around a collection.

Hands up anyone who’d like to see this exhibition, now?

Me too!  And yes, of course, it is a marketing tool, that couch has been placed there, just so – but they do look at least somewhat relaxed and it feels like a real conversation.  They walk amicably around the exhibition, both get to speak and say what they’re keen about in it – and I find it overwhelmingly inviting.

 

Bravo, Dulwich Picture Gallery!

 

 

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Angie Lewin, exhibition

Scottish nature drawings – Angie Lewin

There will be a new Angie Lewin exhibition:

Wednesday 2nd May – 2nd June 2018

The Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh

“Spey Path and Strandline”.

 

Circles, feathers and feather-like leaves abound in this collection of watercolours.  Also known for her strong graphic images as a printer, Angie recently exhibited at City Art Centre, in a group show with a few friends, “A Fine Line”. Previously written about on this blog here.

Read the exhibition catalogue for her new show, here.

And to see Angie at work with her printmaking, pop over to this earlier page in this blog.

 

Online exhibition, Edinburgh

So I curated an exhibition of contemporary art, poetry and readings – and it’s viewable in Edinburgh and online.  The works are by a collection of artists and writers, many of them are friends, all of them are excellent.

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Online catalogue – with tracks for various audio streams: poems, readings of the narrative by congregation members and curator or artist’s comment, describing the work.  This brings the exhibition to you.

https://wp.me/P3Cret-l3

Ideally, you’d visit in person, with the website page on a portable device, with headphones, so you could choose which tracks to listen to, at each artwork.

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However, if you can’t be there in person, the online catalogue is better than nothing.

I was commissioned by St Andrew’s and St George’s West, which is a church in a very central location, in Edinburgh, close to one of the main hubs of the International Edinburgh Festival.

The theme covered are the days from Christ’s resurrection through to Pentecost – all the transformed grief, new hope, encounters and excitement of that time, captured through 21st century disciples reading the words of the eye witnesses of that time, through semi-abstract pictures and modern poetry.  Something for everyone.  Those separate 3 strands of audio are clearly indicated on the audio guide, so if there’s one you’d rather miss (and it may well be the audio tracks recorded by the curator with a sore throat!) – then you can choose that.

For those of us minded to meditate, we don’t need to look far to find in our own lives and those we love, the same themes as in this exhibition: of despair, loss, recovery, transformation, hope, light, breakthrough and accompaniment through dark days.  Perhaps there will be something to think upon in our own lives as we look at the art and poetry.

Love to hear your comments and feedback.

There’s a dedicated Facebook page, ideal for comments, at http://www.facebook.com/SOLedinburgh

Please do check out the link to artists on the catalogue – many of the pictures are available as prints, if they take your fancy.  The artists featured are based in America, Ireland and Scotland.

How to make a photography exhibition

Paul Duke documented the decline of the fishing industry in the Moray Firth, with a series of life-size photos.  He tells the story of how he took those and made them into a whole exhibition.

Paul’s Black and White photos are stunning, and have been put into a book by the same title as the exhibition: “At Sea.”

This is photography as documentary of a community, which will become a record of a traditional industry, as it fades.

At the same time, it is a study in portraiture – for Paul, it was very important that the size of the finished photographs be life-size, as though the people depicted were there, in person.

And finally, it is a collaboration between the photographer, the framer and the maker of the text for appearing beside the photographs.

start small – Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter works across a wide variety of textures and formats: painting over photographs, painting from photographs but blurring, mirrors, versions of a major Titian painting…… where do you even begin?

On what basis do you choose your format?
I choose depending on the way I feel; randomly, in other words. When I haven’t done anything for a long time, I always start small, on paper.

Interview with Anna Tilroe, 1987 SOURCE
If you would like to see where Gerhard Richter went from his small beginnings with new themes and styles – see a 7 minute video of a gigantic exhibition of his works through his life, put together by the curator Hans Ulrich Obrist – equally as famous in his own line of work as the artist.
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Because Hans Ulrich Obrist is such an amazing curator, working together with the living artist, Richter – they have made an exhibition which is the best of both their work – the gathering together of series (currently broken apart, sold and living in separate parts of the world) – and Richter requesting that there be an added unexpected counterpoint on one part-wall, sometimes making a new piece specifically for that.  So you have the best of the old together with an added spice of something new.

There are even mirrors at the beginning and end of the exhibition – so that, as Obrist comments, the viewer becomes part of the exhibition.

Interestingly, as we see how Richter takes a classic painting, paints it blurred and draws interest from painting blurred photographs…. as I paused the video, I noticed that the curator himself becomes blurred in a mysterious way – see his hands in movement.

Cartoons Exhibition: at the Oxymoron Museum with John Atkinson

Always one to darken the door of an art exhibition, and having curated two myself, this diagram, spotted on Twitter this morning, made me laugh.  Delightful.

Plan of Oxymoron Museum

categories of display at the Oxymoron Museum   https://wronghands1.com/

John Atkinson, drawer of this cartoon, has his work exhibited in Time Magazine.  There’s a reason: it’s clever, perceptive and give you a smile or roar with laughter.  (Which, after all, is what we want from a cartoon).

You can follow John’s work at his website Wrong Hands.

Here are a few more gems:

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Exhibition/Film Cezanne : “I will tell you the truth in painting”

Both Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse acknowledge Cezanne: “He was the father of us all”.  Take a walk through a current exhibition of portraits painted by Cezanne with the curator, John Elderfield and English art critic Alistair Sooke – and see what they mean.

Paul Cezanne (unlike almost all the other French Impressionists) was a man of independent means – he inherited sufficient money from his banker father to be able to paint what he liked – and he devoted his life to his work.  He didn’t take commissions to paint portraits because, as John Elderfield says, Paul was too brusquely honest to flatter a sitter; he was concerned with truth, honesty, authenticity.

The exhibition is currently running at the National Portrait Gallery, London – until 11th February –  but if you can’t get to it, there is a handy live tie-in with the exhibition on cinema, opening in UK cinemas, this Tuesday, 23rd January.

I went to see a similar exhibition/film (on Matisse’s cut-outs) and it was like being in a comfortable armchair, wheeled smoothly around the show, and with no one standing in your way.  (Whereas, when you go to see a blockbuster show, there are inevitably a roomful of other strangers keen on looking up close to the paintwork – whom you have to wait and dodge around, all the time harried by the awareness that there’s someone else waiting for you to move away so that they can get their turn at the picture).

Here is the trailer for the Cezanne exhibition film: