success

Simon Armitage, videopoem, video, poem, travel, poetry

Making poetry from the ordinary: Travel

Proof positive that when you’re writing a powerful poem, its shape can be something as simple as a twist on an everyday voice/situation, or the banal pauses between events. And yes, it can include humour.  And it can be great in a video.

(Video by Faber & Faber to illustrate poem “Thank you for Waiting)

Creative Takeaway Prompt

Do you have a very ordinary, boring situation/conversation/speech which you hear everyday?  Take that form and write it so that you make it talk about something else, something you feel passionately about.  Increase the strength of your words at the end to the extreme.  (As Simon Armitage does, in this video).

Advanced – time how long you think it will take you to read your poem, allowing an extra 5-10 seconds. Have a friend video you on a mobile phone in that banal situation, then do a voiceover of yourself reading the poem.  Finally, have the courage to put it on Youtube and publicise it in social media (this could be as simple as your personal Facebook page or Twitter.)

More video work – look at your written poems so far – is there one whose atmosphere could be videoed in a setting which reinforces the message?

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BBC 13 October 2017

Today’s favourite quote…. Success is:

Nile Rogers said it:

Success is a by-product of hard work, consistency and luck.

Nile has 4 decades of success as innovative bassist and record producer/music arranger.

If you want to hear more of his insights – and music – then there is a new documentary series (3 programmes) by the BBC.  If you live in the UK and are a licence-player, it’s on BBC i-player here.

If you live outside the UK, keep an eye on your national TV channel, because this programme has such high quality footage on an international music performer, that it’s bound to feature on stations across the world, in due course.

 

Running for home

There is something so boosting about seeing someone achieving, after hard graft.  So much of life and the achievements we aim for do ask for repeated strivings, over the long-term.

So here’s a little encouragement: Liz McColgan winning the first time the Women’s 10,000 metres was run in the Olympics.  (It’s made with a view to the 2014 upcoming commonwealth Games, so it’s a little dated by references to that – ignore)

10 film-making tips: Terry Gilliam

He who animated the pictures on the Monty Python shows, who filmed “Brazil”, “Time Bandits”, “The Fisher King”, “the Adventures of Baron Munchausen”…. lo he speaketh.

Long story long, there is his autobiography, which he calls his “me-me-me-memoir” and published 4 months ago.  (Judging by which he is beginning to look like Orson Welles…)tgwbook2.jpg

 

Or long story shorter, here are his 10 tips based on what worked for him:

  1. Growing up is for losers
  2. Film School is for foolssearch.jpg
  3. Auteurism is out, fil-teurism is in
  4. Put your ideas in a drawer.  Take them out as needed.
  5. All you’ve really got in life is story
  6. Command the audience with your lens
  7. Nothing can defeat a director who is one with his actors
  8. Surround yourself with improvisers
  9. Directing is not for the faint-of-heart.  Or the sane.
  10. Be an enlightened despot

Ah – but what do all those mystical soundbites mean?

 

Full story an explanation is over at the article from which these 10 ideas were extracted, in Filmmaker:

http://filmmakermagazine.com/36400-the-terry-gilliam-school-of-film-10-lessons-for-directors-today/#.WJiMqiOLQy5