travel

Simon Armitage, videopoem, video, poem, travel, poetry

Making poetry from the ordinary: Travel

Proof positive that when you’re writing a powerful poem, its shape can be something as simple as a twist on an everyday voice/situation, or the banal pauses between events. And yes, it can include humour.  And it can be great in a video.

(Video by Faber & Faber to illustrate poem “Thank you for Waiting)

Creative Takeaway Prompt

Do you have a very ordinary, boring situation/conversation/speech which you hear everyday?  Take that form and write it so that you make it talk about something else, something you feel passionately about.  Increase the strength of your words at the end to the extreme.  (As Simon Armitage does, in this video).

Advanced – time how long you think it will take you to read your poem, allowing an extra 5-10 seconds. Have a friend video you on a mobile phone in that banal situation, then do a voiceover of yourself reading the poem.  Finally, have the courage to put it on Youtube and publicise it in social media (this could be as simple as your personal Facebook page or Twitter.)

More video work – look at your written poems so far – is there one whose atmosphere could be videoed in a setting which reinforces the message?

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suitcase, passenger

Have luggage, will travel

Just stumbled upon this curious but engaging poem on the subject of travel by Irfan Merchant,(published in online mag for unusual poetry or photography, The Undertow Review.)

Carousel

O anxious International Arrivals

clustered around the baggage carousel,

watch hopefully the thick black rubber veils

which still reveal nothing! Another soul

 

waiting to cross the Styx, I’ll take my place.

The grumble begins. The belt shudders, drags out,

baiting the ringside crowd, a zippered case.

(more…)

Tiny House funds world travel!

How do you fund dreams such as travelling the world?  Inspired with wanderlust, Jenna Spesard built a Tiny House with her partner, they spent a year towing it throughout America together.  It’s now in a fixed location but still helps her travel internationally for 3 months of the year, as it saves her so much money.  She is pursuing her goal of visiting 5 new countries each year.

“I don’t work for my house – it works for me” she says.

“Not too long ago, I was working a job I hated, just to pay the rent. I felt stuck and miserable. Then, one day, I decided to change my life. Today I live simply, in a Tiny House, so that I can travel the world for part of the year!”

Jenna Blogs

Jenna blogs at “Tiny House, Giant Journey”.  http://tinyhousegiantjourney.com/  There, she talks about her travels (which you can follow on Instagram) and also other people who have chosen the tiny house option as a way to free up finances.  There are a range of other people who have chosen to downsize, including a single guy or even a family of 5!

Simplicity

Everywhere you look in the video and the website, there are great storage solutions and simplicity.  Inspiring to look at, even if you don’t plan on following the lifestyle completely.  And, of course, it’s horizon-widening to see people who have made uusual life choices.  Jenna is an excellent communicator.

Fulfilling her Life Goal

One of Jenna’s life goals was to travel the world.  Maybe you read yesterday’s blog post of questions to help you find what is important to you in life:whichWAY-

http://bit.ly/2uVXYGg

For a moment, it’s exciting to see where you want to aim…. until you wonder “Where will I find the money to help me reach/train for that?”  Perhaps Jenna’s way of releasing funds is helpful.  It’s certainly working for her.

And what about the world travel?  She has already visited 30 countries – including Iceland, Gautemala, Thailand, Taiwan… and is fulfilling her life’s ambition: to visit all the countries of the world.  Where do you want to go in life?

 

 

3 Little Letters

Now here’s a game we can all play when on a long bus or car journey…. in the UK or Britain-outside-Europe or exEurope/GB or whatever we’re calling ourselves by the time you read this….. anyhow most car licence plates have 3 letters together – and it’s possible to amuse oneself by thinking of funny phrases made up of the initial letters.

e.g. Our family all-time most excellently ludicrous phrase was KAP… which became Kippers Always Pounce.

When done competitively, with good humour, in a carful of people, the permutations grow and the laughter builds.